Monday, November 30, 2015

COVER REVEAL: Saturn Sun: A Novella (The Birthrite Series, #2.5)


The novella that will follow the release of Kindred (The Birthrite Series, #2)...






SATURN SUN: A NOVELLA (THE BIRTHRITE SERIES, #2.5)


 cover by Rowen Poole and Dreamstime


The year is 1944 and the world is in chaos. In Pinewoods, Pennsylvania, Cletus and Alisa Blake are trying to raise their boys, Ronnie and Everett as the country fights in a second world war. The seven-year-old boys differ from their peers, saving their own visions of a "fire man" and a purple sun for whispered conversations after lights out.
Then one summer day when Everett is alone outside, he sees a rather unusual little girl emerge from the forest that is in the back of his family's farmhouse. Immediately fascinated by her, he has yet to find out just how much of an impact this girl will have on the rest of not only his life but that of his entire family.

SATURN SUN is a novella that takes place in between Kindred (The Birthrite Series, #2) and Rapture (The Birthrite Series, #3). It is the beginning of a plunge deep into history, where the truths and reasons behind the prophetic visions had by Nicolae Ganoush, Jonathan Blake, James Livingston, and Hector de Fuentes at the beginning of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) slowly begin revealing themselves. The prophetic visions that forever linked their bloodlines.

To be released on Valentines Day in 2016...





*****

For first access to giveaways and other content not seen by the rest of the world, sign up for the free Messages from the Labyrinth Newsletter!

Paperback copies of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) and Sacred Atonement:Novelette (The Birthrite Series, # 1.5) available together for the low price of $21.00 at my Official Website


My music projects are available at CDBaby
My filmwork is on IMDb

"The Birthrite Series" and other books at Smashwords and Barnes & Noble NOOK
 My books and music are also on Amazon and iTunes
Tiffany on Goodreads
Support great authors and independent bookstores at Smashwords and Indiebound
 
 

Sunday, November 29, 2015

This Week...

Hi everyone!

I hope you all had a great holiday and weekend. :)

I will be back this week with a new Vixen recap and an my new Human Behavior essay on the subject of Morality.

Have a lovely remainder of your weekend.

 Tiff







*****

For first access to giveaways and other content not seen by the rest of the world, sign up for the free Messages from the Labyrinth Newsletter!

Paperback copies of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) and Sacred Atonement:Novelette (The Birthrite Series, # 1.5) available together for the low price of $21.00 at my Official Website


My music projects are available at CDBaby
My filmwork is on IMDb

"The Birthrite Series" and other books at Smashwords and Barnes & Noble NOOK
 My books and music are also on Amazon and iTunes
Tiffany on Goodreads
Support great authors and independent bookstores at Smashwords and Indiebound
 

Saturday, November 21, 2015

More Interesting Witch Trial Finds or "Morality: An Intro"

Hello to all my lovely readers,

As I prepare my blogpost on Morality in our society (the newest essay in my Human Behavior analysis series), I wanted to share some more findings from my research into the witch trials in early colonized America.
For the time being, I'm taking a little break from Salem and focusing in on my own home state of Pennsylvania. I feel that doing so will help with understanding the trials of Salem a little more, especially when I delve into Cotton Mather's biography.
I am also calling this an introduction to my blogpost on Morality because these are things I want you all to consider when going into reading that particular essay.

As I stated in one of my last postings, I started reading Thomas White's Witches of Pennsylvania: Occult History and Lore. Now another reason for my wanting to focus on Pennsylvania for the time being is that the state's history with witch trials may surprise some. In one of my first postings on my research into the witch trials, I stated how many - when imagining witch trials in the early colony - think of these simpletons with their pitchforks, shovels, and torches, screaming "burn the witch" as they drag the helpless accused woman from her home and straight to the stake she is to be burned at. It is also often stated that if a woman 'dared speak her mind' or 'mouth off' she was immediately presumed a witch. Well...while that may not be completely historically inaccurate, neither of those were actually the cases in many instances. In fact, as I also said in a previous post, several men were also accused, tried, convicted and executed of witchcraft. Now I hear some say "but, but, but...there were still more women executed then men!" True. However, in getting back to Salem for a brief minute, men weren't completely excluded from facing even death for supposedly practicing witchcraft. No one within the Salem magistrate said "Oh...John Proctor...he has a penis, right? Damn! Our bad. He's a man. Acquit him." Nope. In fact, on the day of Proctor's execution, the men outnumbered the women at the gallows as Proctor was executed with three accused male "witches" (George Burroughs, John Willard, and George Jacobs, Sr.) and one woman (Martha Carrier). So no, men were not immune to witch accusations or executions.
As I also stated in a previous post, the more popular method of executing a witch in the American colonies was hanging and not burning (the latter was the more chosen method of execution in Europe). And being accused of witchcraft didn't automatically mean you were screwed. Some of those accused were acquitted, including Mary Parsons, whom I portrayed in a Halloween event at the Depreciation Lands Museum. She and her husband were also able to sue her main accuser, Sarah Bridgman, for slander.
Yes, while Salem was definitely among the more extreme cases of witchcraft accusations and trials, how did other states - like Pennsylvania - handle them?

Pennsylvania was founded in the 17th century, founded by William Penn. William Penn, according to several biographies and sites dedicated to him, was a Quaker and an early advocate for democracy and religious freedom. He had also developed good relationships with the local Native American tribes and under his direction, the city of Philadelphia was planned and developed. He also presided over Pennsylvania's first and only witch trial.
In February of 1684, Margaret Mattson and her neighbor, Yethro Hendrickson, stood before Penn as accused witches (the first ones to be accused of such a crime in the English colony). According to Thomas White's book, official record of the trial is sparse. But according to legend, Penn asked of Mattson if she ever rode through the air on a broomstick. Being from Sweden and only able to speak limited English, she didn't understand the question but answered yes. Penn then replied by asserting that there is no such law against riding a broomstick through the air.
Now there is no official record of that exchange, so who knows if that even happened. But what is available is quite telling. According White's book, when the jury deliberated and returned with their verdict, Mattson was found guilty of "having the common fame of being a witch, but not guilty in the manner and form she stands indicted." She was fined fifty pounds and released back to her husband. But despite her found innocence, Mattson is known to this day as the Witch of Ridley Creek.
Now this particular trial occurred several years prior to the events at Salem, though having come from Europe, Penn and the jurors were well aware of the long history Europe had with witch hysteria. They wanted to prevent such hysteria within the colonies. As Quakers, they held more pacifist views and were also more tolerant toward other religious practices, faiths, races, and ethnicities. With their belief system, there was no way that they could, in good conscience, convict a person based on such flimsy evidence. They also seemed aware that the accusations against Mattson were based more on vendetta as opposed to actual beliefs in her practice of the 'dark arts.' The fine and probation bestowed upon Mattson was more to appease her accusers. After that, the state of Pennsylvania would not prosecute accused witches, though it could not stop citizens from believing in them. There were also some slander cases that involved a few accused witches suing their accusers.

So with no one able to turn to the legal system for relief from a suspected witch, many had to take matters into their own hands. As people of many different backgrounds, ethnicities, and religious practices entered William Penn's religiously liberated colony, they brought with them their own beliefs and practices, including their beliefs on magic, folk healing, and witchcraft. From these communities - particularly from within the Pennsylvania Germans (or Pennsylvania Dutch as they are often referred) - powwowers (not to be confused with the Native American practice of the same name) and hex doctors rose in popularity. Think of Moll Derry from one of my previous posts.

I will get more into the use of powwowers and hex doctors in a future post (but think of what Chadwick Hansen said in Witchcraft at Salem about the three degrees or levels of witchcraft in the meantime). I will also delve more into the following:

- how a prominent judge helped an accused witch escape her accusers.

- the family of Johann Seiler and how they were sought after by many for their healing practices until the last practicing relative of Seiler passed away in 1950.

- how many in 19th century society regarded the notion of witchcraft and accusations of such (you might be surprised).

Until then, keep all this in mind as we approach my essay on Morality in my analysis of human behavior.



Sources:
John Proctor
http://historyofmassachusetts.org/john-proctor-first-male-accused-witch/

William Penn
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Penn 

Witches of Pennsylvania: Occult History and Lore
book by Thomas White

Witchcraft at Salem
book by Chadwick Hansen 






*****

For first access to giveaways and other content not seen by the rest of the world, sign up for the free Messages from the Labyrinth Newsletter!

Paperback copies of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) and Sacred Atonement:Novelette (The Birthrite Series, # 1.5) available together for the low price of $21.00 at my Official Website


My music projects are available at CDBaby
My filmwork is on IMDb

"The Birthrite Series" and other books at Smashwords and Barnes & Noble NOOK
 My books and music are also on Amazon and iTunes
Tiffany on Goodreads
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Monday, November 16, 2015

Meganne Stepka Releases New EP, INNER DIALOGUE

Hey all!

Just spreading the word for a fellow artist and musician. Check out her press release below. :)



Meganne Stepka will release her newest EP, Inner Dialogue, on 11/11. The EP is an intimate introduction to this fierce muse of the night and a glance at her library of work. Stepka selected the name by reflecting her personal inner dialogue and hoping to inspire her audience to do the same. “Any chance you get to get someone else thinking or feeling more makes the world a better place, it just does; it’s simple physics,” says Stepka.
The EP features “Mary Ann,” an upbeat pop song inspired by her grandma. The single was recorded/produced by Matt Troja (Nashville/Cleveland/LA) and mastered by Grammy award-winning engineer Brad Blackwood. It is followed by “Harmony’s Conflict,” a stream of consciousness piece recorded to tape in whispers in the middle of the night. The other two tracks, “Blue Fairy Tale” and “Change What You Can,” lie somewhere in between, showcasing Stepka’s diversity. “Folk, pop, experimental, indie, rock, alternative or electronica…it just depends on the day, what instruments are used, it all depends on the song. I like structure sometimes, but I never think about genre when I create, I think about concepts and feeling, textures and moods, words that I am moved to say, sing and repeat. I think about the song existing in time and really, I don’t think about any of that. I just make art with vibrations.”
In addition to a variety of sounds and songs, Meganne also creates and produces alluring artistic videos, short films and has very recently had one of her experimental tracks featured in an award winning short film, produced in Cleveland. Stepka puts on a good live show solo or with a band, but isn’t playing out much until early 2016 with the release of her multimedia live project ALITD (see her website for this one). If you are in Cleveland, you can catch Meganne performing a few of her songs live Monday Nights at 9pm opening up the evening at her weekly open mic, where it seems, she is also facilitating a bit of a revived musical community in Lakewood,OH at Kelley’s Pub.
With all of her endeavors, it is her work at night that brings this woman back to what she feels is a musical mission alongside the universe: “to be herself” – creating, recording, philosophizing in lyric and sound, productions, and concept albums. Inner Dialogue is certainly a concept album and a good way to introduce yourself to the music and artworks of Meganne Stepka.

Check out more at her website. :) 





*****

For first access to giveaways and other content not seen by the rest of the world, sign up for the free Messages from the Labyrinth Newsletter!

Paperback copies of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) and Sacred Atonement:Novelette (The Birthrite Series, # 1.5) available together for the low price of $21.00 at my Official Website


My music projects are available at CDBaby
My filmwork is on IMDb

"The Birthrite Series" and other books at Smashwords and Barnes & Noble NOOK
 My books and music are also on Amazon and iTunes
Tiffany on Goodreads
Support great authors and independent bookstores at Smashwords and Indiebound

Saturday, November 14, 2015

VIXEN (THE FLAPPERS, #1) Recap: Chapter 5 "Clara" or "Why Couldn't the Author Just Focus On Clara's Story?"

Hi everyone,

Well it begins again. These chapter by chapter recaps of Vixen (The Flappers, #1). I'm actually excited about getting back into them.

Now as I am having intense editing sessions in order to get Kindred (The Birthrite Series, #2) ready to go for a January 1 release, these recaps will only be done every other week for the time being. Maybe after the release of Kindred and during the bleak winter months I will switch to weekly recaps, but for now, every other week is more doable.

So now, onto the recap of Chapter 5.



First, if you are new to these recaps (or you need a memory refresher from when the last was posted), here are the other recaps starting from the Prologue through Chapter 4.









Now when we left the world of 1923 Chicago, the uber priveleged Gloria shocked everyone by cutting her hair into a bob. Then it became a scene right out of Titanic with Gloria in the role of Rose. Only a much more annoying and very unlikable version of Rose.
But thankfully, we are back to Clara's story as so far, she remains the most tolerable and realistic main character in this story.

But I digress.

Chapter 5 opens with Clara lamenting over how bored she is in the Carmody home. She longs for New York and the life of excitement that living in an apartment filled with bohemians, artists, and other flappers and musicians brings.

Clara was bored. She'd been living in the Carmody home for almost a week, and the only evening activity so far had been cards (which she hadn't known could be played without stripping or drinking). Everyone had bought her country act so far, with the possible exception of Mrs. Carmody, who was always watching. No doubt waiting for Clara to make a mistake so she could ship her off to reform school.
Only, Clara wasn't going to give Mrs. Carmody that satisfaction.
Clara put down her book, La Vagabonde by Colette, about an actress who rejects men in order to retain her own independence--a fitting read for her current state of mind. To bad she hadn't read it back in New York; she could have saved herself the trouble of fall in love with the wrong man and getting her heart broken.

Now this is a very well-written introduction and says much about Clara's character and her life in New York. At this time, I'm starting to get the impression that even the author herself likes Clara better than the other two female leads. Because up to this point, the chapters concerning Clara are far better written than the chapters concerning Gloria and Lorraine.
Anyway, back to the recap.

Her thoughts of New York are then interrupted when she hears peels of laughter echoing from down the hall. Of course, the hyena-like laugh (the author's words) come from our favorite girl, Gloria. After thinking of how the two other girls wouldn't survive a day in her old New York life, an amused Clara goes to eavesdrop on her cousin and Lorraine. And of course, Gloria and Lorraine are thinking they are so terribly clever as they loudly gossip...about a girl who is living just down the hall from them...



Gloria: I'll bet she hasn't even been kissed before.
Lorraine: As if you've done so much more.
Gloria: Shut up. I mean, I'll bet she hasn't even, say, gone on a date.
Lorraine: Definitely not.
Gloria: Do you think she's (gasp) a lesbian?
Lorraine: Who knows what they do on that farm?

Glora: Oh, Raine. She's ridiculous. So polite. So annoying.
Lorraine: She's a fifty-year-old woman trapped in an eighteen-year-old's body.
Gloria: She's practically best friends with my mother.

Clara couldn't help smiling...

And Clara has every reason to smile and laugh at them. I mean seriously, Gloria and Lorraine have got to be the absolute worst gossips ever. The whole point with gossiping about someone (especially a person you have hatched some Mean Girls-esque against and want that person to remain in the dark about) is for them to NOT find out. And if you have the person of your disdain in the room down the hall from you, and you are under the impression that said person is generally a homebody (like Gloria thinks Clara is) wouldn't you first check to make sure that person is not within hearing range (large houses like the ones the Carmody's live in tend to reverberated noises like loud laughing) and second, maybe KEEP YOUR VOICES DOWN in case that person comes within hearing range?




I know that up until this point, Gloria and Lorraine have both proved to not be the brightest bulbs on the string, but still. Common sense, maybe?

So right now, Clara is listening in on the not so carefully constructed gossip session between the village idiot and her lackey when she hears the two girls mention the plan in which Marcus is involved. That's also when she hears a deep, whispering voice behind her.

"Caught you!" a deep voice whispered to Clara.

That's not creepy at all.

Then turns around and discovers everyone's dreamboat, Marcus.

Now in a previous chapter recap, I had decided to give Marcus theme music anytime he enters a scene. It was going to be ZZTop's "Sharp Dressed Man" but as I read more of his character, I decided that the Bart Baker parody of Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines" is much more fitting.

 

Now in this case, I guess I can cut Marcus some slack with creeping around in the dark and sneaking up on Clara. It becomes obvious that he was here to see Gloria and Lorraine. In the process of heading to Gloria's room, he happened to catch Clara eavesdropping. Fair enough.

Well, Clara nearly loses herself upon seeing the gorgeous Greek god we all know as Marcus and 'Flapper Clara' comes close to re-emerging when she takes him by the hand and pulls him into her room. Marcus, in turn, is surprised by the supposedly prudish 'Country Clara's' behavior. This actually leads to the first exchange between Marcus and Clara.

"I wasn't eavesdropping, if that is what you are insinuating."
"I would never accuse you of such an immoral act."
"Good," she said, "because I would never think to commit one."
The boy tugged her toward the bed. She resisted slightly at first, but then happily yielded. She quickly crossed her legs, which she assumed was the sort of thing they taught in the etiquette classes she'd managed to skip in high school.
His hand was warm. "You've never been tempted to do an immoral thing?"
How she wanted to whisper into his ear what she wanted to do to him right then and there! Instead, she withdrew. "I think that is an outrageously inappropriate question to ask of a stranger."
The boy examined her slyly. "You certainly are a strange one, Clara."
Clara shot him a look of mock horror. "How did you know my name?"
"You're Glo's cousin." He tilted his head. "I'm Marcus."

Again, the author beautifully describes Clara's inner conflict and struggle with resisting Marcus. And he is actually pretty well-written throughout the entire passage and almost appealing.
I have also come to the conclusion that the loud gossip session between Gloria and Lorraine was used to get Clara out of her room in order to make the exchange with Marcus happen and find out that there is a plan of sorts that involves her. Okay. As I said in the recap of chapter 1, I understand that sometimes an author does need to use an easier or more convenient plot point in order to move the story along. There are times I've had to do it in my own stories. But maybe a better way of going about it could have been as follows:

Clara is in her room reminiscing about the good times she had in New York when she remembers that Gloria is having Lorraine over. Curious over what the two might be up to, she decides to amuse herself by eavesdropping on their conversation. She could hear their hushed voices, and while she has to strain to make out what the two are saying, she is able to hear them say her name, followed by something about a plan. Then Marcus comes sauntering in and the rest of the scene happens. Boom.
 
It is also during this conversation that Marcus mentions going to the Green Mill with Gloria and Lorraine. Clara is of course shocked to find this out. Not only is Gloria going to a speakeasy, but it is had for Clara to imagine her cousin going anywhere without Sebastian. Then Marcus tells her that it's a sort of bachelorette party for Gloria. He also tells her that he's taking her to the Green Mill. Clara also suspects that this could possibly be part of the plan she overheard.
Then Marcus leaves. Maybe I should give him exiting music too. I'll think about it.

After that, there is a section break.

When we return from the section break, we find out about the plan for Clara to meet Gloria in her room at eleven p.m.
As Clara makes final preparations and putting necessary items in her purse, she starts to remember her last time at a speakeasy in New York. The time she managed to escape a police raid at a speakeasy, steal a police wagon and go for a joyride. This is yet another well-written and very interesting and enjoyable look into her past:

Clara just laughed and laughed and gave the wagon more gas.
She never felt so free. She turned onto Fifth Avenue and flipped off the siren, watching the reflection of the wagon as she whooshed past the storefronts, then took a spin through Central Park, meandering past the reservoir, popping the siren on every now and then to see whom she could startle. She was coasting along Riverside Drive as the sun rose over the East Side. She found an empty intersection and parked the paddy wagon dead center, and removed the key from the ignition. She'd toss it in the Hudson when she got the chance.
It was foolish, of course, and totally reckless, but damn, it was exciting. She remembered wishing life could be like that always, a wild goose chase without a destination. A chase for the thrill of running.

Ultimately, the destination that early morning had been jail.

 After Clara revisits the night that was cause for her to be sent to live with her aunt, there is a section break.

Then we see Clara knocking on the door to Gloria's bedroom.

Gloria lets her in and we are treated to her grace, wit, and charm.




Actually, no. Gloria still is a self-entitled brat.

But we are given privilege to how - after a single awkward visit to a speakeasy - she is suddenly an expert in all things regarding speakeasies the flapper lifestyle. Or she's the world's biggest poser. I guess we'll find out.

Anyway, after a continuity error with Gloria's dress (in one passage it's described as gold and in the other it's described as red), Gloria pretends she's being generous by giving Clara a less than flattering dress to where to the Green Mill. It is then we find out about one of Clara's day jobs in New York:

Little did Gloria know that in New York, Clara's clothes had been the fabric of legend. If Clara wore a new outfit on Saturday night, flappers would storm Madison Avenue the next day in search of it. Once of her day jobs had been working as a fitting model for Bergdorf Goodman's new ready-to-wear line. All irregular or damaged clothes - European or American - were hers to keep. Clara didn't just set new trends, she set chic ones.

While this does start putting Clara into "Mary Sue" territory, I suppose that sometimes characters do need to have larger than life qualities to keep them interesting so long as they are well-placed. I can let this one go.

Then Clara puts on the dress.

She picked the peach dress up off the bed and slipped it over her head.

Now normally there wouldn't be anything wrong with that sentence, but the way it is written in the context of the passage, it reads as if Clara slipped the dress on over the clothes she is already wearing. No "Clara quickly took off her skirt and blouse before picking the peach dress up off the bed and slipping it over her head." Nope, she just goes into Gloria's room, helps Gloria finish getting ready and then slips the dress on. Therefore I am going to assume our fashionista will be rolling up into the speakeasy wearing the peach chiffon dress over her skirt and blouse. Fancy. 

Gloria and Clara make small talk about Lorraine and Marcus as they fix their makeup at Gloria's vanity table. Clara asks if Marcus and Lorraine are together. Gloria says they are not.
I'm going to breeze through this part because every time Gloria is in the room, it's all about Gloria. And now Gloria is the bestest flapper badass ever. EVER.











After getting ready, Clara returns to her room to get her purse. Before turning on the light, she hears something fall to the floor, thinking it's her cash, she turns the light on. But it isn't her cash. It is a folded piece of paper.

She picked up the small piece of thick, cream writing paper folded lengthwise. Where had it come from?
Tentatively, she opened the note. Scrawled in elegant black cursive were three words:

I found you

Obviously this freaks Clara out. She is paralyzed with fear until Gloria barges in and demands that they leave now. Because it's all about Gloria. Overnight badass flapper chick sensation, Gloria. And don't you forget it.



Clara manages to fend Gloria off by promising she'll be ready once she spritzes on some perfume. While she's alone again, she tries to think of who the note could be from. Surely it must be a prank? Maybe something between Marcus, Lorraine, and Gloria.

The thought peeves Clara, but something still isn't right. This ends the chapter.

Deep down, Clara knew the note was not a joke. It was the exact opposite - devastatingly serious. She spritzed the Chanel perfume into the air before her, walking through it and out the door. The mist settled onto her skin, the top floral note masking the darker ones that lay hidden beneath.

A beautifully written end to a chapter, actually. If only the entire book could be like this. As of now, I'm wishing Ms. Larkin would have made Clara's story the only focus of the book.

But...next up is Lorraine.

At least it's not Gloria. For now, at least.







*****

For first access to giveaways and other content not seen by the rest of the world, sign up for the free Messages from the Labyrinth Newsletter!

Paperback copies of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) and Sacred Atonement:Novelette (The Birthrite Series, # 1.5) available together for the low price of $21.00 at my Official Website


My music projects are available at CDBaby
My filmwork is on IMDb

"The Birthrite Series" and other books at Smashwords and Barnes & Noble NOOK
 My books and music are also on Amazon and iTunes
Tiffany on Goodreads
Support great authors and independent bookstores at Smashwords and Indiebound





  


Monday, November 9, 2015

Coming Up In November

Hi everyone,

After a busy October I am ready for things to calm down a bit, though I will hardly be sitting idle.

First, I recently performed musically at the Depreciation Lands Museum for their event, A Winter's Tavern Night, this passed weekend. Here is a quick video of the preparations for the event:




I am also happy to announce the winner of my Halloween Blog Hop giveaway where I gave away a signed copy of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1). The winner is Paul Worley of Sharon, PA. So congrats and I will be sending the book tomorrow. :)

And speaking of my book series, I will be releasing the ebook version of Kindred (The Birthrite Series, #2) on January 1, 2016 (with the paperback to follow shortly after). And as I said a couple times, January 1 is a significant date within the series. It becomes more obvious in book 2, but it even shows up in Descent if you are paying attention. :)
December 1 will bring the cover reveal for Saturn Sun: A Novella (The Birthrite Series, #2.5) along with a release date, so stay tuned for that as well.

In blogging news, I will be continuing with my Human Behavior Essays. I covered Lie Spotting and Generalizations in the following essays:

The Art of Lie Spotting or "Yes, you've been lied to...and you probably liked it"

 Generalizations: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly, and the 1950s

An essay studying Morality (and how I feel we are living in the most "moral" time in at least recent history) will follow shortly, and then essays on Victimhood and Leadership vs. Followership.
In these essays, I have been using the 1950s and our society's love/hate relationship with the era. I will still continue using the 50s, but I am also going to be integrating Colonial America's 17th century witch trials, along with giving those witch trials their own blogposts.
As I stated in my post on the Salem Witch Trials in the Halloween Blog Hop, I recently started reading Chadwick Hansen's Witchcraft at Salem.


 Reading Hansen's work also prompted me to purchase two other books:


Witches of Pennsylvania: Occult History & Lore by Thomas White and The First American Evangelical: A Short Life of Cotton Mather by Rick Kennedy

I will get more into these in future postings. Like many events in history, the witch trials may not be completely what they are made out to be. Was Cotton Mather really the 'Puritan killjoy' and monster that he has been made out to be for so many years? And how did William Penn handle Pennsylvania's first and only official witch trial? These questions and many others will be discussed.

This week will also bring the resuming of the Vixen (The Flappers, #1) chapter recaps. If you wish to refresh your memories, here are the recaps currently available:






Well that is all for now. :)






*****

For first access to giveaways and other content not seen by the rest of the world, sign up for the free Messages from the Labyrinth Newsletter!

Paperback copies of Descent (The Birthrite Series, #1) and Sacred Atonement:Novelette (The Birthrite Series, # 1.5) available together for the low price of $21.00 at my Official Website


My music projects are available at CDBaby
My filmwork is on IMDb

"The Birthrite Series" and other books at Smashwords and Barnes & Noble NOOK
 My books and music are also on Amazon and iTunes
Tiffany on Goodreads
Support great authors and independent bookstores at Smashwords and Indiebound